Conclusion of JPA: CEO’s message

by Kieren McCarthy on February 9, 2008

Full transcript below:

Hello. My name is Paul Twomey, and I’m the President and CEO of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers — or ICANN.

ICANN is an international, non-profit organization created in 1998 by the Internet community in response to a call from the United States government to coordinate a key part or what enables billions of computers and other devices worldwide to connect quickly and easily with one another and to share information between themselves.

This system, known technically as ‘unique identifiers’, includes such things as domain names and internet protocol addresses. Without that system, the internet as we know it simply would not exist.

The blueprint for this new institution was as unique as the Internet itself. Recognizing that a global addressing system this powerful should not be managed by one interest group or one individual, a new type of multi-stakeholder model was envisioned where all parties would sit down, devise and agree a policy before it was implemented.

This institution, ICANN, was specifically designed to be led by the private sector. Indeed, it was the President of the United States who directed that this should occur.

In 2006, however, the memorandum of understanding between the United States government and ICANN was changed to recognize the significant progress ICANN had made. The community and ICANN have achieved more in 2007 than in any previous year.

Now, the United States government is asking people for their comments in a review of the agreement. Over the past nine years ICANN has built an Internet-style liberty where anyone at all can get involved in developing the policies that help define the Internet’s future expansion.

What the past nine years has taught us, however, is that there are no signs of the internet’s capacity for change ending. The steady state of the internet is in fact a state of change.

And so ICANN, as a body that seeks to keep pace with the internet’s twist and turns, has learned to embrace change going so far as to hardwire it into its constitution. Change has become part of ICANN’s makeup. It simply has to be.

We must always strive to do more to serve today’s 1.1 billion users of the internet and tomorrow’s billions more.

What has happened since 1998 could hardly have been imagined when the United States government first helped create ICANN. And with hindsight the original plan to grant the organizational autonomy within two years was profoundly optimistic.

But over the course of ICANN’s nine years the organization has developed from the ground up to become a stable and transparent body where coordination is valued above control; and where no one party can claim precedence over another.

At ICANN meetings held three times annually individuals from every corner of the globe and significantly from every corner of society sit and debate the future policies of the internet’s naming and addressing system.

It is evidence that the organization is fulfilling its mandate and responsibilities. For example, input from the community has shaped our principles and frameworks for accountability and transparency which you can find on this website. [http://icann.org/transparency/acc-trans-frameworks-principles-10jan08.pdf]

The international board of ICANN believes that ICANN is fulfilling the responsibilities it assumed in the JPA back in 2006. Moreover, the move towards greater community ownership has led to more effective and more efficient policy development.

As such, ICANN believes it is now time to take the next logical step and recognize the successful completion of the joint project agreement. This will not change the way things are done now to coordinate the internet’s addressing system.

It could, in fact, be a move that makes it more secure as the model is enshrined rather than being perceived to be still being evaluated by one government. Let me be clear.

We’re not talking about terminating the JPA tomorrow, but it’s equally clear that the model ICANN represents of coordination–not control– of multi-stakeholder participation and led by the private sector needs to be confirmed once and for all.

Until the 15th of February, the United States Department of Commerce will be receiving comments from the public. If you think now is the time for another step in creating confidence in a globally coordinated internet–not a controlled one– then now is the time to make your voice heard.

To find out more, please read the ICANN JPA submission for more detail. You’ll find that here on the ICANN website under the heading ‘Joint Project Agreement, ICANN’s Response.

Thank you for listening.

{ 21 comments }

哲学 02.09.08 at 5:56 am

I think ICANN should play a more inportant role in the global Internet today

热门榜 02.09.08 at 6:00 am

So, what role will United States Goverment play in the Internet after the JPA be agreed?

Anonymous 02.09.08 at 6:13 pm

ICANN is evil.

Paul Levins 02.09.08 at 6:34 pm

Thanks for this comment. Feel free to support ICANN’s position by sending the letter available at http://www.icann.org/jpa/comment-letter.html

Alternatively, send a comment of your own making to JPAMidtermreview@NTIA.doc.gov

Thanks for your interest

Paul Levins

Paul Levins 02.09.08 at 6:42 pm

This should be the subject of discussion by the community.

But concluding the JPA need not change the key realtionships ICANN has now. The IANA contract could stay the same, the US government’s role in the Governmental Advisory Committee would stay the same. ICANN would still have all the forms of scrutiny by the community that exist now.

The thing about concluding the JPA is another step towards transition towards the original model envisaged by the US more than nine years ago.

We should have a discussion over the remaining term of the JPA about what we think final transition is as a community for when the JPA concludes in September 2009.

Paul

Paul Levins 02.09.08 at 6:46 pm

I don’t feel particularly evil today…will report any horns growing or garlic being waved.

Either way, exorcise (sorry – couldn’t resist) your rights and if you think ICANN is evil, tell the NTIA http://www.icann.org/jpa/comment-letter.html

Paul

Kieren McCarthy 02.09.08 at 6:48 pm

Thankyou for this. We will raise the issue of evilness in the public forum this week and see what the community feeling is.

I don’t think we will be able to reach a consensus decision on this but we might be able to put forward an amendment on malevolence or perniciousness.

I will keep you informed.

Kieren McCarthy
General manager of public participation

Anonymous 02.10.08 at 5:53 am

You can’t hide anything from everyone.

All in due time.

Indignado 02.11.08 at 10:31 pm

QUERIA ACREDIARME COMO VENDEDOR EN LA ICANN PERO SIN EMBARGO ME DOY CON LA SORPRESA DE QUE TE PIDEN DE QUE SEAS MILLONARIO PARA PODER SER ACREDITADO POR LA ICANN, DE VERDAD QUE ES INDIGNANTE Y ASI SEA HACE LLAMR UNA EMPRESA SIN FINES DE LUCRO, ES LA PEOR MENTIRA DEL MUNDO Y QUIESIERA SABER SI ALGUIEN ME PUEDE DECIR COMO DENUNCIAR A ESTA EMPRESA ICANN, EN CONCLUSION LOS REQUISITOS QUE PIDE ESTA SUSODICHA EMPRESA LA ICANN ESTA FUERA DEL ALCANCE DE CUALQUIERA QUE QUIERA EMPEZAR SU NEGOCIO DE VENDEDOR DE DOMINIOS, SON UNOS LADRONES CON FINES DE LUCRO

Paul Levins 02.11.08 at 11:21 pm

Si usted cree que uno de los registradores acreditados de ICANN-es una violación de su acuerdo con la ICANN, por favor, envíe un correo electrónico a registrar@icann.org con la mayor cantidad de información que tiene disponible acerca de las áreas específicas de la acreditación de acuerdo en que usted cree que se están Violados.

Paul Levins
Executive Officer and
VIce Presidnet Corporate Affairs
ICANN

Paul Levins 02.11.08 at 11:26 pm

Anonymous

We’re not hiding but you are.

Paul Levins

Kieren McCarthy 02.11.08 at 11:27 pm

I’m hiding. If you read this, you’ve just imagined it.

Kieren

Kieren McCarthy 02.11.08 at 11:30 pm

Yo no sabia que usted hablar espanol, Paul.

Kieren (aka Rodriquez)

Pablo Hinojosa 02.12.08 at 8:18 pm

Estimado “indignado total”,

Mi nombre es Pablo Hinojosa, soy enlace regional de ICANN para América Latina. Leí tu comentario en el blog de ICANN y quería hacerte algunos comentarios:

El acuerdo que fija los requisitos para acreditarse como registrador en ICANN no lo fijamos nosotros, los que trabajamos en ICANN, sino que se fijó mediante un procedimiento que fue respaldado por la Junta Directiva de ICANN y aprobado en 2001:

See: http://www.icann.org/registrars/accreditation-history.htm

Como sabes, el proceso de decisiones de ICANN se basa en un modelo de creación de consensos “de abajo hacia arriba” y los cambios en los procesos ocurren por acuerdo de la comunidad global de Internet.

El modelo de acreditación de registrars fue diseñado para generar competencia en el mercado de los nombres de dominio. Este proceso requiere que una compañía cuente con los recursos necesarios para asegurar que sea estable (los requerimientos técnicos para mantener un registro cuestan dinero y es vital que los registros no colapsen, para evitar que los usuarios pierdan acceso a sus dominios).

De hecho estamos en proceso de revisar el acuerdo de acreditación de los registrars. Si crees que este acuerdo debe cambiar, por favor participa en ICANN y defiende tus argumentos. Estoy disponible para ayudarte en lo que necesites.

Anonymous 02.13.08 at 1:23 am

Your phone calls? Your emails? Pictures of certain things? Documented evils of the body of ICANN?

Anonymous has long watched ICANN. You do, after all, serve us.

Tuyen dung, viec lam, tuyển dụng, việc làm 02.15.08 at 5:46 pm

Website chuyên về tuyển dụng, tìm việc làm miễn phí với nhiều cơ hội hấp dẫn nhất dành cho các bạn.

Paul White 02.25.08 at 9:02 am

Interesting stuff…..I’m just embarking on a PhD in the area of Internet governance and international regime theory. The relationship between ICANN and the US Government is one of the major issues I want to look at and I would be very keen to talk directly to people inside the organisation about this. Can anyone help me out here, by suggesting appropriate people within ICANN I could contact? I’ve already tried the general ‘contact us’ link but without too much success. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Anonymous 02.26.08 at 1:46 pm

Good luck. You’ll need it.

Paul Levins 02.28.08 at 2:38 pm

Yes Paul I would be happy to speak with you about this. Sorry – only just saw your request.

Also as background see the very front page of the ICANN website under a heading ‘JPA Mid Term Review ICANN’s response’ as background.

You can contact me on my number +1310 823 9358. Or email me at paul.levins@icann.org

Also Kieren McCarthy our manager of Public Participation can be got on the same number.

Paul

Paul Levins 02.28.08 at 2:42 pm

LOL!

How do I contact you Anon? You sound like a fun person.

Paul

Paul White 03.01.08 at 4:36 am

Many thanks, will be in touch shortly.

Comments on this entry are closed.