Which region is taking the lead in IPv6 deployment?

by Leo Vegoda on September 28, 2008

IPv6 is in the news because the mainstream media have started to pick up the fact that IPv4 will be fully allocated in the next two or three years. And IPv6 deployment is important if we want to keep the Internet growing sustainably.

So where is IPv6 deployment most evident? It?s a very difficult thing to measure. It is difficult to measure the amount of IPv6 traffic as so much of it is tunneled inside of IPv4. And anyway, tunneled traffic is probably from end users rather than ISPs, but we need ISPs to deploy IPv6 to allow the Internet to grow. So how can we see where ISPs are deploying IPv6 in their networks?

One possible measure of IPv6 deployment in ISPs is the number of IPv6 address blocks (prefixes) seen in the routing table in comparison with the the number of autonomous systems (ASs – roughly equivalent to ISPs) in a region. Geoff Huston has a regional breakdown of advertised ASs on his web site and the SixXS project has a regional breakdown of the IPv6 address blocks visible per region on its web site.

AfriNIC, the Regional Internet Registry for Africa and parts of the Indian Ocean, has a higher proportion of networks in its region announcing IPv6 addresses than the others. Africa also has a smaller deployed base but IPv6′s size is designed to support exactly the kind of network growth that highly populated areas, like Africa and Asia will see as their deployed base grows in the next few years.

Proportion of ASs in RIPE NCC service region announcing IPv6 prefixes

Proportion of ASs in RIPE NCC service region announcing IPv6 prefixes

Proportion of ASs in APNIC service region announcing IPv6 prefixes

Proportion of ASs in APNIC service region announcing IPv6 prefixes

Proportion of ASs in ARIN service region announcing IPv6 prefixes

Proportion of ASs in ARIN service region announcing IPv6 prefixes

Proportion of ASs in LACNIC service region announcing IPv6 prefixes

Proportion of ASs in LACNIC service region announcing IPv6 prefixes

Proportion of ASs in AfriNIC service region announcing IPv6 prefixes

Proportion of ASs in AfriNIC service region announcing IPv6 prefixes

{ 8 comments }

Man 09.29.08 at 12:53 am

Да, интересная информация, берём на заметку …

Jeroen Massar 10.02.08 at 12:23 am

The numbers to add, so to NOT confuse the people who now shout that Africa is going so great:

See SixXS Ghost Route Hunter for the live data:

* 6bone (144) (phased out on 6/6/2006)
* RIPE (1119)
* APNIC (490)
* ARIN (706)
* LACNIC (115)
* AfriNIC (60)

There are thus ONLY 60 IPv6 allocations in the African region, if you then follow the link, you will find the following nice thing: “Thus 19 (33.33%) networks are currently correctly announced.”
As there barely is no Internet in Africa, (especially when looking at ASNs, and remember that a lot of US ASN’s are used in Africa) yes you might reach 22%.

Wow, yes that is a lot compared to the rest of the world:
AFRINIC – 19 (33.33%)
LACNIC – 37 (32.17%)
APNIC – 223 (45.70%)
ARIN – 239 (34.00%)
RIPE – 548 (49.02%)

Europe wins again! :)

Statistics again show how easily things can be misunderstood and interpreted in various ways.

Leo Vegoda 10.02.08 at 8:00 am

Jeroen, I don’t think anyone would disagree that the other RIRs’ service regions have a numerically greater number of networks running IPv6. I was looking at a single statistic which shows something I found interesting: that although there are fewer networks in total in AfriNIC’s service region a decent proportion of them have started to work on implementing IPv6.

A fuller analysis obviously needs more data and I look forward to the results of the research CAIDA is doing with ARIN:

http://lists.arin.net/pipermail/arin-announce/2008-September/000749.html

Jeroen Massar 10.04.08 at 10:36 am

I actually think the numbers might be skewed even more because, I guess, a lot of networks that are in use in Africa are actually using non-African IP/ASNs. eg, a large ISP can just use their US-based address space there too and don’t even have it registered in Africa. Then again, I am far from sure about this as I am don’t have much to do with Africa. I know one thing to: there is no 6to4 in Africa, nor is there a Tunnel Broker. Thus even if there is IPv6, it stays in the networks that have it and I can’t believe there is a huge population of actual users then (which is also something that is always the question: when it is there, is it actually used? and if so, how does one determine that it is used, meh, statistics ;).

What would be more interesting is looking at the population size, then determining the amount of IPv4 and IPv6 availability to end-users. I am fairly sure that the numbers are really low in the general case. Only thing I can guess is that Asia would have the largest amount of users, especially because of Korea, Japan and China. But those are only assumptions, no empirical evidence available at all :(

Olivier Crepin-Leblond 11.04.08 at 7:52 am

Thank you for covering this, Leo.

My question is “how long will it be before ICANN as an organisation recognises the seriousness of the problem?”

ICANN has finally gotten the gTLD, IDNs & ccTLD train moving and yet, we are still hearing issues of Names for most of the time at the Cairo conference and IPv4 / IPv6 is barely touched.

Rather than having individual voices from concerned members, attendees, and board members, is it not time to create a fast track cross-constituency working group to deal with the question:
“What can ICANN do to facilitate, promote & stabilise the migration to IPv6 – and for those that oppose the wording “migration”, I’d word it as: “the cohabitation of v4 and v6″

Whilst your entry in the log is laudable, I wonder about the extent of official support there is behind it and about its purpose.

Leo Vegoda 11.04.08 at 10:36 am

Hi Olivier,

Thanks for your comment.

My experience is that ICANN staff, board and others are very interested and involved in addressing (pun intended) the issues surrounding IPv6. A lot of that work happens outside of ICANN meetings, though. Unsurprisingly, IPv6 adoption is a key issue for industry, regulators, governments and others. You’ll often find us at these events.

Nonetheless, IPv6 was a key focus for the Paris meeting a few months ago.

One key reason for us going out to the operators, regulators and others is that they are the people involved in deployments, training and awareness raising. Particularly the operators.

Can you give examples of the sort of output you would expect the cross-constituency working group you mention above to come up with? What could it get ICANN to do to help speed up the rate of IPv6 adoption that isn’t already being done by other groups?

Leo

buyvend.com 11.18.08 at 3:43 am

people paying attention to ICANN? They’re saying that IPv4 will be fully allocated in the next two or three years

Easter 10.08.09 at 5:45 am

The IPv6 Summit offers two days of international and Australian experts, plus an optional one-day IPv6 Deployment Workshop to provide a hands-on guide to implementation.

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